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is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
of american commercial technology. it's a threat that cannot be tolerated and i hope we will hear from our witnesses about the extent of the problem and the steps we can and should take to counter it. the asia pacific region and another round of bill which runs from the dictatorial regime in north korea has caused concern here in the united states and among our allies in the pacific. that regime has announced its intention to resume plutonium production, has tested a nuclear device in february that it appears to have had a greater yield than previous tests and has threatened at any time to launch a missile that could further exacerbate tensions. we have read about conflicting intelligence assessments of north kea's abity to put a nuclear warhead on the missile. we hope our witnesses will be able to clear up that isue. in the middlet, iran continues to float the international community in pursuit of a nuclear program that is a significant challenge to the nation and to most of the world. while the diplomatic arrangement in which iran joins the responsible community of nations remains the pr
with viewers how have you used this technology? >> sure. the iran the targeting program in u.s. africa command from 2007 to 2010. you're right we don't call them drones. we call them remotely piloted aircraft. the key there it takes 200 people to keep one of these airborne for a 24-hour orbit. it has incredible level oversight scrutiny, intelligence, lawyers, commanders watching us use the tools. there are very legitimate questions as to whether we should use lethal force in the counterterrorism strategy overseas and how is that legal and whether it is the right strategy. once you decide to use lethal force and picking a platform, the rpas give you a tremendous amount of scrutiny, oversight, persistence, per significance and flexibility to abort at the last minute if the target moves or civilians come into the area. jenna: that is why i want to mention use of language is very important. when you say drone, oh, these are things flying around the skies. >> right. jenna: one person having a cup of coffee behind directs these type of things. as you point out that is not exactly the case. let's tal
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more, sunday at 8:00 and c- span's "q&a". came into the white house. she was a 47-year-old lady who hated politics. thewas deeply depressed at death of her last surviving son. especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. friends,ot have many unfortunately she had a wonderful family who kept her going. there always seem to be somebody there. i do not think he read very much. she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. with that intellect and wonderful education, it seemed wasted in some way. >> the conversation on jayne pearce, the life of the 14th president, is now available on our web site. tune in monday for our next program on the first lady, mary todd lincoln. >> this documentary comes from zachary cohen of the adele davis academy in sandy springs, georgia. his message to the president looks at funding for education. it is a second prize-winning video in this year's c-span studentcam competition. >> this is
to our critical infrastructure. >> how do you work to prevent this? >> we have technology, cyber technologies, prevention technologies. we spend a lot of time now on technologies.
the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing that we had to do first was to bring it to the attention of the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. of but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th, patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher, "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you have generated so many questions, wow. i mean, i ity -- i don't know if we keep track of a record -- i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] t
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
, but this is where can't i enter the way i did, that i certainly see that with the technology going the way it is and with drone technology advancing a drone to small and smaller, they're not going to be the giant, the big predators that are flying over pakistan. they will be little small drones that could be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of, this is actually happening. >> host: booktv is a location on the campus of the university of southern california at the al late-onset to our books. we are talking with mark mazzetti, security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife." jim, you're the next caller. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i to question. i've already posted to one of the largest providers of service to the cia and also the war department in afghanistan. and i asked him howe a fghans was going. and i quote him in this remark right now. he says that is basically a total failure. and then went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> guest: well, yeah, it's
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10